Hélène - profile

Hélène Delanglez

Project Manager

INTERVIEW

What about your work challenges you on a daily basis? Juggling multiple tasks at once, the constant movement of people, changes in EU regulations, fluctuations in the music market, etc. – but it’s also the most exciting thing about the job!

What do you like most about the MCO? There is absolutely no day-to-day routine.

What is your most memorable moment with the orchestra? There is not one but several, all so different it’s hard to choose. If I had to pick I would say: summer 2006 in Aix-en-Provence and Edinburgh, with 2 very different versions of the Magic Flute and where secondarily – everyone ignores that – a world famous head-butt actually saved an opera performance, the Orchestra’s 10th anniversary in Ferrara and finally the Radial Night with Pekka Kuusisto last year.

What do you need to feel at home while on tour? Just need to hear the orchestra play the concert and I know I’m right where I should be.

The first piece of music you fell in love with: Ma Mère l’Oye – Ravel.

BIOGRAPHY

Hélène Delanglez has been with the MCO since 2005. She started as an intern and spent several years working mainly on the administrative side of the orchestra’s projects. Now, as project manager, she has a pivotal role – juggling all the different aspects of projects and working with all the tour’s protagonists – which she enjoys very much.

She grew up in Reims, France, doing her homework in the attic of her parents’ bookshop, listening to the trombone classes of the Conservatory just across the street, before going to her percussion class in the basement of that very same building

Hélène studied law and cultural management in Grenoble and Paris, worked in a bookshop and in the Centre National du Livre on a literary project before finally becoming a happy Berlinerin to join the MCO.

For the past ten years she has been enjoying the wide variety and continual evolution of her activities both on tour and in the MCO office, as well as the constantly evolving structure of the orchestra and the richness of human encounters that her work brings.